Collaborations Workshop

CRAFTING, CLEANING & CARING

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About

Workshop hosted by Rianne Makkink in Andelsbuch, Austria. Organised by Werkraum Bregenzerwald.

www.mischertraxler.com
www.mischertraxler.com
www.mischertraxler.com

Team Monja Hirscher, Elisa
Curated by Maja Vardjan, Cvetka Požar
Partners Miloš Bavec, Tina Zajc Benda, Duška Rokavec, Geological Survey Of Slovenia
Organised by Maja Vardjan, Cvetka Požar, Nikola Pongrac, Museum of Architecture and Design
Photos Luka Karlin, Jure Horvat, Mischer’Traxler Studio, Beno Ogrin
Location Ljubljana, Slovenia

Special thanks Aleš Kacin; Franc Jaklič; Katja Žagar, Tina Zajc Zver, Rokodelski center Ribnica; Suzana Fajmut Štrucl, Rudnik Mežica; Stanislav Kores, Nataša Vodušek Fras, Talum tovarna aluminija, d. d., Kidričevo; Vilijem Podgoršek, Geološko – palentološki muzej; Stevo Žegarac, Mineral, d. d.; Dominik Slabe; Metka Kogovšek, Šalovs farm; Mirko Vranjek.
With the generous support of Centre for Creativity, operated by the Museum of Architecture and Design in Ljubljana and co-financed by European Union from European Regional Development Fund and by the Republic of Slovenia.

Stone is quarried in order to construct buildings and monuments

Stone is quarried in order to construct buildings and monuments. It is cut up and polished to make wonderful statues, objects and interior finishes, but stone is also extracted, mined, pulverised or burnt in order to extract minerals of many kinds to produce a great amount of the objects that populate our daily lives. Nevertheless, we hardly think of stone when we touch iron, unwrap food from aluminium foil or hold a battery in our hands. The design project Ratio embraces crafts in order to tell a story about stone and its hidden metallic mineral components.Each piece in the series reveals the proportion of metal contained in a specific metal ore by combining it with its metallic equivalent in the form of metal sheeting. The size of a metal sheet 3 mm thick is always as big as the resulting material one would get when theoretically processing the stone into the metal.

He focus of observation are the widely invisible systems, structures and methods associated with the material.We examine the material earth, the stakeholders who are working with the material and their interests in it. We look at ways these professionals are approaching earth, which manual, mechanical or intellectual gestures they perform towards it and for which reasons they are moving and processing it into information, into bricks or into objects.

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    “GESTURES IN HANDICRAFT” BY THERESA BINDER AND JULIA OBERMÜLLER People from the Bregenzerwald were asked to have a typical hand gesture of their craft moulded. There are specific gestures to each handicraft, to all cleaning and caring activities. The artefacts at hand, however, also show less obvious ones. Also, customer care was included in the list of ‘care activities’ and represented in a typical gesture as well. Can the gestures of the plaster moulds be clearly assigned to a certain craft or activity? Can care and cleaning be separated from crafting? The lines are blurred. White plaster puts the gesture in the spotlight and makes the hands more anonymous. At the same time, the objects show every fingerprint, every pore of the skin so that the respective person’s identity is inscribed in the object. Again, the work plays with the blurry lines between generalisation and differentiation. Working in handicrafts can and will cause scrapes or even cuts on the hands, meaning that scars are part of the craft. This is why they can also be seen on the objects.

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    “CARE” BY MICHAEL DORFER AND ANNA-AMANDA STEURER IN COLLABORATION WITH JUPPENWERKSTATT RIEFENSBERG In the Bregenzerwald, for festive occasions, women wear traditional costumes called Juppe. They are counted among the oldest and most valuable garments in Europe. The Juppenwerkstatt Riefensberg produces the fabric for this fascinating, stern-looking piece of clothing. But despite requests from all corners of the world, the small factory will not reveal how the fabric is made; local people are very identified with their traditions and the factory’s philosophy is not to sell home. cARe is about the mystery of the recipe and the grandness of this particular textile with its deep black, shiny surface and small pleats. Scan the link with a mobile phone and the box will reveal its content by means of Augmented Reality.

As an act of practice-based research and reflection of one’s own practice the designers started each day with a cleaning ritual to foster special attention to gestures and tools used in the process. Through gathering samples, filming evidence and collecting materials related to the act of cleaning found in the region and the work environments of the craftspeople involved in the project, they developed a design concept revolving around the act of cleaning. The outcome of Crafting, Cleaning and Caring are five research-based products and interventions as products, which re-think the process and design within the capacities of the different regional craftspeople, their practice and production processes at their companies at hand. The results of this collaborative approach are presented in wooden crates, a display methodology developed by Studio Makkink & Bey. This form of presentation allows for easy transport and at the same time supports the act of exhibiting the work in a simple and effortless way within the context of a traveling exhibition such as MADE IN. The form of the crate increases the awareness of the content displayed, and in regards to the project on hand enhances the perception of the act of cleaning.

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He focus of observation are the widely invisible systems, structures and methods associated with the material.We examine the material earth, the stakeholders who are working with the material and their interests in it.

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As an act of practice-based research and reflection of one’s own practice the designers started each day with a cleaning ritual to foster special attention to gestures and tools used in the process. Through gathering samples, filming evidence and collecting materials related to the act of cleaning found in the region and the work environments of the craftspeople involved in the project, they developed a design concept revolving around the act of cleaning. The outcome of Crafting, Cleaning and Caring are five research-based products and interventions as products, which re-think the process and design within the capacities of the different regional craftspeople, their practice and production processes at their companies at hand. The results of this collaborative approach are presented in wooden crates, a display methodology developed by Studio Makkink & Bey. This form of presentation allows for easy transport and at the same time supports the act of exhibiting the work in a simple and effortless way within the context of a traveling exhibition such as MADE IN. The form of the crate increases the awareness of the content displayed, and in regards to the project on hand enhances the perception of the act of cleaning.

The form of the crate increases the awareness of the content displayed, and in regards to the project on hand enhances the perception of the act of cleaning.

The form of the crate increases the awareness of the content displayed, and in regards to the project on hand enhances the perception of the act of cleaning.

Explores repairing and maintaining of crafted objects, which adds layers of patina and creates long lasting relationships between objects and subjects. The workshop Crafting, Cleaning & Caring by Dutch designer Rianne Makkink explored the materiality and immateriality of such relationships and looked into methodologies of doing things informed by the practical knowledge and the daily work routine of craftspeople. In collaboration with local craftspeople, producers and makers, the participants worked with traditional techniques and experimentation.

Funded by
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Organised by
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